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Architectural and Engineering Managers

General Information

Description

Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as architecture and engineering or research and development in these fields.

Business Breakdown

People in this career work in these sectors.

  1. Private, for profit85.40%
  2. State and local government5.51%
  3. Federal government4.22%
  4. Private, not for profit2.60%
  5. Self-employed2.28%

Workplace at a Glance

What you can expect to experience while on the job

  • Responsibility
  • Exposure to job hazards
  • Physical activity
  • Decision making
  • Repetitiveness
  • Level of competition
  • Time pressure

Industry areas

  • Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics

Job Outlook

Employment of architectural and engineering managers is projected to grow 2 percent from 2021 to 2031, slower than the average for all occupations. Despitelimitedemployment growth, about 14,000 openings for architectural and engineering managers are projected each year, on average, over the decade. Most of those openings are expected to result from the need to replace workers who transfer to different occupations or exit the labor force, such as to retire.

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Related Military Careers

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Related MIlitary Careers X

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Salary

Average Salary

Salary

$152,350

State-by-state Salary

Gray states indicate no data available

$191,420
$94,690
No Information for this section

Education

Most Common Education Levels

People in this career achieve this level of education.

  • Bachelor's degree 45%
  • Master's degree 27%
  • First professional degree 12%
  • Post-master's certificate 11%
  • Doctoral degree 1%
  • Associate's degree 1%
  • Post baccalaureate 1%
  • High school 0%
  • Some college 0%
  • Less than high school 0%
  • Post-doctoral training 0%
  • Post-secondary certificate 0%

Knowledge

  • Design
  • Engineering and Technology
  • Customer and Personal Service
  • Mathematics
  • Computers and Electronics

Skills at a Glance

Skills helpful in this career

  • Verbal skills
  • Critical thinking & problem solving
  • Equipment operation & maintenance
  • Math & science skills
  • Technology design & control
  • Leadership
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